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Cannabis Legalization & Hemp After The Election (Ministry of Hemp Podcast)

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The Ministry of Hemp Podcast
Cannabis Legalization & Hemp After The Election (Ministry of Hemp Podcast)
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What did the most recent election mean for the future of cannabis and hemp?

In episode 64 of the Ministry of Hemp podcast, our host Matt is joined by the whole Ministry of Hemp crew: Editor in Chief Kit O’Connell, Brand Manager Drew De Los Santos, and Videographer Desiree Kane to discuss cannabis on the election 2020 ballot. While the American public may be split on somethings, cannabis legislation is not one of them.

For more on the subject, Kit’s article on hemp after election 2020, too.

You’ve got hemp questions? We’ve got hemp answers!

Send us your hemp questions and you might hear them answered on one of our Hemp Q&A episodes. Send your written questions to us on Twitter, Facebook, matt@ministryofhemp.com, or call us and leave a message at 402-819-6417. Keep in mind, this phone number is for hemp questions only and any other inquiries for the Ministry of Hemp should be sent to info@ministryofhemp.com

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Voters chose cannabis legalization in election 2020. What does that mean for the future of industrial hemp? Photo: A whiite person's hand holds up a hemp leaf, with the word "Legalize" added next to it. Cannabis election
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Cannabis legalization & hemp after the election: Complete episode transcript

Below you’ll find the complete transcript of episode 64 of the Ministry of Hemp podcast, “Cannabis legalization & hemp after election 2020”:

Matt Baum:
I’m Matt Baum and this is the Ministry of Hemp podcast brought to you by ministryofhemp.com America’s leading advocate for hemp and Hemp education.

Matt Baum:
Hope everybody had a good Thanksgiving holiday and I know ours was a little strange in the Baum house because of COVID and whatnot. We didn’t really get to hang out with the family, but we still made the best of it and it went really well, but it felt like a nice relaxing end to a pretty stressful month and the main stress of this month yes, definitely COVID but there was also an election. So today we’re going to talk about the election, but don’t worry. We’re not going to get into the Trump stuff and Biden stuff. Not at all. Today, we are going to talk about cannabis on the ballot.

Matt Baum:
I wanted to give everybody a few weeks to just decompress after how gnarly the whole election process really was before we can talk about this kind of stuff, but it seemed like a really good time to get together with the other Ministry of Hemp guys and just talk through what went down as far as cannabis measures that were on ballots all over the United States. So here is our little Ministry of Hemp round table discussion about cannabis and the 2020 election.

Meet the Ministry of Hemp team

Matt Baum:
I am joined here today by the entire Ministry of Hemp crew, which is awesome because we’ve never done this. We’ve had Drew, Kit and I have done some shows, we’ve had Drew in some shows, but Desiree is here too. Desiree, why don’t we start with you say hi to the kids and tell them what you do for Ministry of Hemp.

Desiree Kane:
My name is Desiree Kane. I’m a Miwok two-spirit that recently moved to the Pacific Northwest in occupied Salish territory. What I deal with Ministry of Hemp is right now, I’m doing the holiday guide with Drew and Kit, where I get to take beautiful pictures of a whole bunch of products that you can come to Ministry of Hemp and see Kit’s input and review and learn some things about CBD comes in so many different forms and you can expect to see my pictures in there. Sometimes I also do educational videos. So you’ll see me making spritzers and also perhaps explaining to you what is CBG or what is CBN.

Matt Baum:
You have the glamorous job. We’re all here rolling around in the muck and editing and you’re making spritzers and making videos.

Desiree Kane:
It’s not awful.

Matt Baum:
Fair enough. That was the most punk rock intro we’re going to hear tonight by the way and I really liked it. Drew introduce yourself again. We know you but you know, just for the kids who are the new listeners.

Drew De Los Santos:
Yeah. My name is Drew and I am the brand manager at Ministry of Hemp, just making sure everything’s flowing and that we keep working with great brands

Matt Baum:
And then kit our editor in chief say, hi.

Kit O’Connell:
Hi everybody this is Kit O’Connell great to be here again.

Matt Baum:
Do you know kit? He’s been with me on a bunch of our Q and A shows. We’re not doing a Q and A show today, but what we are going to do, I don’t know if you pay attention to the news or not. It was a little election recently and it got some coverage and people freaked out about stuff and I know my heart almost stopped a few times and if it wasn’t for CBD, I probably wouldn’t still be here. But luckily I have lots of samples and they got me through that week. We just wanted to let it re-decompress a little bit, maybe except what happened with the election and then we can move forward from there. But we’re not here to talk about that.

Matt Baum:
We’re here to talk about marijuana and Hemp in the 2020 election. Because while we can say that it looks like America is very split. If you look at the election results and how many votes went to Republicans and many went to Democrats. One thing they don’t seem to be split on at all is marijuana and Hemp, which is kind of shocking. It was on a ton of ballots all over the United States and it won pretty big not just that but psychedelics as well in the form of mushrooms seem to win really huge Desiree you just moved to Portland. Tell us what went down in Oregon, which blew my mind by the way.

Cannabis & other drug laws change after election

Desiree Kane:
So Oregon, basically it is now legal or will be by 2023 to have therapeutically administered psilocybin therapy, which psilocybin is also known as magic mushrooms. They also decriminalized low levels of all drugs.

Matt Baum:
So what does that mean? Exactly? Because there are some pundits that freaked out, of course, and they’re like, Oh great, now kids can walk around with heroin. Like what does that exactly mean small amounts of drugs? Or is there a number on anything or-

Desiree Kane:
That’s something that I would have to look into it following that vote. I do know that basically they’re going to approach it as a public health thing and if you have certain types of controlled substances, you’ll be into a therapy program instead of sentenced to the prison industrial complex which creates a whole other set issues that are problematic.

Matt Baum:
It’s also very similar to a lot of programs that are going on in Europe right now, where rather than demonizing addiction, you work with addicts and [crosstalk 00:06:07].

Desiree Kane:
It’s the same thing Portugal has done.

Matt Baum:
Yeah, and it’s super successful and it scares a lot of people here in the United States, but guess what? It works folks, and it’s here because you have voted for it. So what else did we have on the ballot? Anybody let’s try in, let’s talk about this.

Kit O’Connell:
Well, I want it to jump off of what Desiree with the same, because what’s just happened in Oregon. You know we don’t know what’s going to happen at the federal level. Obviously a lot is still to be seen about what’s going to come. But if you look at the platform for president elect Biden, his platform that he ran under actually was quite progressive on the war on drugs and one of the things that he talks about in there is encouraging the people be diverted away from the prisons for possession. So we could see that there actually has been some Republican support for reducing the war on drugs too.

Kit O’Connell:
So they’re seeing as something that has some bipartisan support and there’s even one of the things that we’re seeing that’s interesting is that there’s this growing bipartisan support from the people of the United States, across the political board for cannabis legalization, a majority of people, it’s almost 70%. I think in one of the studies I saw across the political spectrum now support cannabis legalization and that’s really extraordinary. So that includes Democrats, Republicans, young people, old people, people from all backgrounds, races, if you lump them all together and take an average, the vast majority of people support this idea.

Matt Baum:
So real quick, just to spell it out, marijuana specifically cannabis was made legal for medicinal reasons in Mississippi and South Dakota. These are two distinctly red States like South Dakota has legalized medical marijuana and they have a governor that didn’t want people driving Hemp through the state. So the people have definitely spoken there pretty shocking and then voters legalize the possession of marijuana by adults in Arizona, Montana, New Jersey and South Dakota. So they got medical marijuana and recreational marijuana in South Dakota, which I thought for a long time, I’ve been saying for a long time, Nebraska will be the very, very last state to legalize marijuana and it will be after Puerto Rico is a state. So watch for that and now South Dakota has just proved me, right? Because South Dakota they’re very hostile to this stuff, but the voter [crosstalk 00:08:42]-

Kit O’Connell:
Montana?

Matt Baum:
-Yeah, I mean it blows my… Actually Montana we’ll see, from what I understand, that’s going to be on the ballot there soon too. So we’ll see. It’s the people that are coming out and voting for this. We listened to what a lot of officials say and look at laws. They’re trying to put on things to hold cannabis back, hold Hemp back. But then whenever it goes to the ballot, guess what? It gets voted in. The only reason it wasn’t on the ballot in Nebraska it’s because our governor said, there’s a problem with the paperwork. Try again next time and then ran around in circles so they couldn’t catch him because we were basically saying, what is the problem with the paperwork? Tell us they wouldn’t answer until it was too late and so it didn’t make the ballot and just like you said, kit, when polled in Nebraska, 74%, 74% of the population said, yeah I’m fine with it. It does not bother me at all.

Desiree Kane:
There also not a governor that can avoid in States like the Dakotas or any of the bread basket States, the big agriculture industry that comes with it. So the farmer, I think we can expect the farmers to be a little more mobilized around it and that’s why you have governor Noem in North Dakota, doesn’t want it driven through or whatever. But there are Hemp farmers who are being locked out of a crop and at the end of the day, that’s the constituency base that rules those States, right? So in the best interest of the farmers is to get on board and that will inevitably shift the politics of the governorship.

Matt Baum:
Oh definitely, and if you look at that list of States, almost all of them barring New Jersey really are well in Arizona maybe are agricultural States. So this States know where their bread is buttered. Nebraska is one where we have gently said, well we want to look into what it’s like growing Hemp and they’ve been very wishy-washy about it because the farmers want it. But like you said, you have governors who have to run on their constituency and they are terrified that their constituency will look at them and say, “Oh you’re a hippie and you like smoking weed now, got it.” We’re going to vote for this crazy person. That’s going to tell us it’s a sin or whatever. So-

Desiree Kane:
The supreme court recently resolved that issue where the electoral college didn’t have to vote the will of their constituency base. So moving forward, your vote is going to matter in a way that it hasn’t been before really and so it will become increasingly important to vote when you have these opportunities, because it can change American politics if we wanted to, we just have to actually organize around that.

Matt Baum:
Definitely. I also think it’s hilarious that a lot of these States you have very hard line, not just anti-cannabis, but just anti-drugs all across the board. Candidates who now have to look at the people that voted for this and go, “Oh, okay well, I guess that changes things a little bit and maybe I have to loosen up on some ideas of my own.” So-

Drew De Los Santos:
I mean, I think it’s like, it’s become undeniable of the various benefits of legalizing cannabis and legalizing Hemp and making sure that they get those regulations out quickly I think because in Texas, like right when all of the other States legalized cannabis and marijuana, one of the state senators, or state representatives in San Antonio, he put down a bill to legalize it here in Texas stating that, because of Corona virus, there’s a $4.6 billion budget hole that we’re going to have to deal with next year and the years to come. So it’s like, here’s an easy solution that doesn’t involve raising people’s taxes, you know add another revenue stream and it’s like, there’s only so many times that you can ignore that before it’s just like glaringly obvious.

Matt Baum:
It’s funny because we voted for gambling here, but we couldn’t vote for cannabis and I know don’t get me wrong, cannabis has ruined far more lives than gambling has in this country. We all know that to be true. So it’s absolutely ridiculous.

Drew De Los Santos:
Speaking of the records, one thing that was cool that happened in Arizona was as soon as it was voted in one of the district attorney in Arizona’s largest County started dropping the charges for people like immediately. So they immediately started dropping marijuana charges for folks there, [crosstalk 00:13:27]. which I thought was great.

Matt Baum:
That’s even more important. Definitely like, that’s the even larger side of this is when you start legalizing it for adult usage, you have to look at all these ridiculous cases and overcrowded prisons and overcrowded courtrooms and just get rid of this garbage, get rid of it. So we can focus on real issues, real crime, real problems, not the guy that had an ounce in his pocket when he got pulled over for doing five miles over the speed limit or something. So I’m really interested to see where that goes.

Kit O’Connell:
It has to be said too, they’ve done studies now consistently that showing that there’s a racial disparity when it comes to arrests around drugs and one of the problems that we’re seeing is that that racial disparity does not disappear even under most forms of legalization, “legalization.”

Kit O’Connell:
There’s always still ways that you can break the law in a legal state. You could sell weed without a permit or you can have too much of it or all kinds of things can happen and they’re showing that it’s still a disparity that black people and people of color are arrested more even though when they do studies in drug use, it’s the same that white people and people of color use drugs at the same where even white people use them more depending on the drug. So we need to make sure that we’re expunging cases and we’re making sure that there’s an accessible and like a level playing field under whatever we call legalization.

Matt Baum:
Definitely. So what happened in Texas? Tell me Texas people, Drew and Kit are both Texans. What happened? I thought this was supposed to be on the bill. I thought it was supposed to pass. I thought you guys were going to flip blue. You both promised me it was going to happen.

Kit O’Connell:
[inaudible 00:15:15] We always say that We’re going to flip blue.

Drew De Los Santos:
Maybe if it had been on the ballot, we would know but I think it always gets caught up like marijuana legalization bills always get caught up like in the Senate committees or they never leave the committees and I think our governor hasn’t been very willing to sign it, even if it does go through, but maybe Kit you can speak more to that.

Kit O’Connell:
Well, that’s one of the things that we’re seeing is it, we talked about how the people tend to support legalization, but the politicians don’t always. That’s definitely the case here in Texas and Hemp it’s very distinct on the whole. They’ve passed a very pretty broad, you know they nationally legalized Hemp in 2018, but here in Texas, the policy is pretty broad. They did try to ban smoke able Hemp, but even that got overturned by our court and least temporarily people can smoke hemp here again. Yeah so the populace wants it, the politicians are resistant, but Hemp is supported. It’s interesting that we talk about this a lot. There are two forms of the same plant they’re growing in very different ways, but they are at the base the same plant and it’s weird that politicians have accepted that it’s safe. As long as it doesn’t have THC in it. It’s, it’s very arbitrary amount of THC 0.03% is extremely low, so low that it’s even hard for people who are just making CBD products sometimes to keep it below that throughout the entire process.

Cannabis after election 2020

Kit O’Connell:
So we’ve created this arbitrary distinction, and now we’re talking about how we’re going to enforce it, or at least the politicians really want to enforce it. I hope to see that that is breaking slowly there’s talk that we may see a congressional vote on some form of marijuana legalization in 2021. I don’t know if we’ll see enough to get it through both parts of Congress, but we probably will see a vote on it. Biden does seem like he supports medical marijuana and he supports the States, making their decisions on recreational. That’s based on his platform. Obviously you’ve seen presidents change once they actually get into office, but based on his platform, he wants to see less jail time for people for possession in general, he wants to see a medical marijuana nationally passed and he wants the States to make up their mind recreationally. That’s a pretty good if we could get there, that’s pretty good.

Matt Baum:
I mean, we’re almost there 36 States. We have 36 States that have either enacted or voted to enact medical marijuana and then we have 15 States where adult usage is totally fine. So we’re way past halfway there. I can’t do that math but that seems like it’s close to 50, you know?

Kit O’Connell:
We’re even at the point where… One of the things I thought was interesting that started recently was there was some proposal. I saw this in Hemp Industry Daily. So I’ll give them a shout out, that we’re starting to see so many States legalize that theoretically those States could start working together and sort of forming blocks. Like right now we have the Oregon cannabis industry and the Washington cannabis industry and each state is in a silo. But there’s enough neighboring States that have all legalized. They could start actually working together and your dispensary in Portland could be selling the best stuff from Washington state. I’m sure there’s pros and cons of that

Matt Baum:
You got a conference just like college football. [crosstalk 00:18:53] You’ve got conferences, all of a sudden.

Kit O’Connell:
I think there’s a lot of interesting potential. The more that’s starts happening, the less it starts to live viable for the country to keep it illegal at all.

Why cannabis matters to hemp

Matt Baum:
Now I know people that listen to the show and I’ve had a couple of comments come at me whenever I do a podcast where we start talking about marijuana or THC related stuff and they say, I thought this supposed to be a Hemp show. Why are we talking about marijuana? So why are we all sitting here talking about marijuana when we are the Ministry of Hemp? Why is that?

Drew De Los Santos:
Well, I think that Hemp has helped to show an economic opportunity for the plant and it’s just like, there’s so much business that’s it just comes along with opportunity for people and not controlling a plant. Like these things are connected, not controlling business, not controlling what individuals do, when it doesn’t harm anybody else and it hasn’t been proven to harm anybody. Then the other thing about it is that it’s related because people still get arrested for Hemp. Like you were mentioning people can’t drive through South Dakota and people get arrested here in Texas for Hemp, even though it’s legal. So if marijuana was legal, that problem would go away and it would be time that wasn’t wasted money that wasn’t wasted going through this arbitrary legal process.

Matt Baum:
I just totally tricked Drew into saying exactly what I wanted to hear. That was perfect.

Drew De Los Santos:
Hey, that’s my opinion.

Matt Baum:
No, but I don’t disagree at all. I think we’re at a point now in the United States, where as bizarre as this sounds, I would argue that marijuana is probably less regulated, not regulated, but is probably easier to gain legally and work with legally than Hemp is in a lot of States. And that is preposterously stupid. Just inane. If we’re afraid of THC fine, let’s be afraid of THC, but the United States has shown we’re not. We’re not scared of it. When you put on the ballot, we’re going to vote for it. So it’s time to stop pretending like one, there is some issue with 0.03 THC in Hemp that makes it perfectly safe and okay, we can raise that number. We could raise it to 10% and you still wouldn’t even be coming anywhere near the good stuff, if you will. You know what I mean?

Matt Baum:
And it’s so limited right now. I just did a wonderful interview with a woman. That’s going to… I don’t know if it’s going to be next week or the week after that was talking about Hemp plastic and one of the reasons that’s holding things back like Hemp fibers and Hemp plastics is because big business doesn’t know what to do yet. They’re looking at marijuana being legalized and going, well their safe money there and we know we can do that. We can take credit card payments for it now in a lot of States where this has been approved and whatnot. Banking is becoming easier for marijuana than Hemp and that is ridiculous. That makes no sense to me. Does anyone have any thoughts on why we’re still having to talk about this at this point 36 States voted for medical marijuana, 15 it’s totally legal, but Hemp is still having trouble and it was legalized by the farm bill. Why are we still talking about this?

Kit O’Connell:
One problem is just like, we don’t want to get into the details on this show, but there has to so much just like divisiveness and politics, even though sometimes there’s been bills proposed to fix some of the issues with Hemp that’s left behind in the Hemp industry. There just hasn’t been the time or the energy or they’re being distracted by other things. It’s hard to get it on the agenda. Hard to get a lot of things on the agenda and Hemp is included in that list right now unfortunately.

Kit O’Connell:
Even though some people do want to fix it, even Mitch McConnell has shown that he has said he wants to fix some of the holes that were left behind by the 2018 farm bill legalization of Hemp, but it was just too much [inaudible 00:23:00] and there’s too much going on as we all very well know to let that in [inaudible 00:23:05] I think one problem too is just this like we do have this patchwork of laws. They still don’t have a FDA regulation. We still don’t have a USDA regulations that everybody can agree on and all of that’s holding the industry back too, and it’s even still this sort of like some States do it this way. Some States do it that way and I’m sure, you know the banking industry wants to come in and do a one way across the country and that’s still not possible for Hemp.

Matt Baum:
Yeah. Banking and insurance, both especially crop insurance. That’s one of the things with a lot of the farmers that I’ve talked to. Crop insurance is such a nightmare because it’s different from state to state to state. Now that is true also with corn and soybeans, but corn and soybeans are not limited other way in other States are [fightyard 00:23:53] traded as commodities and Hemp is not. So it’s little things like that. It’s easy for us to say “we did it, we voted, we won, we’re legalizing marijuana and we’re fighting for Hemp.” But that fight is not over. It’s nowhere near over and we need to keep telling the people in power.

Matt Baum:
We want this and we don’t just want this because one, we want to get high. That’s it man. Or we’re hippies and we like wearing Hemp clothes. No, we want it because it’s important for our farmers. It’s important for business revenues. Like Drew said, it is important to free up frivolous lawsuits and get people out of prison that should not be there and it’s important for our own wellbeing. There’s so many pluses to this and we can’t stop fighting yet. I think that’s the most important thing to remember. Let’s not just say, “we did it, we got rid of Trump, all our problems are gone. All of them.” No, they’re not.

The history & future of cannabis in the U.S.

Desiree Kane:
Well, I think that there’s honestly a debt to be paid on a national level when it comes to cannabis. Because look at the history, cannabis was first called Indian Hemp and it came illegal when there were floods of Mexican, quote unquote Mexican immigrants like migrating in. So it’s part of a vast criminalization mechanism that is built into the system. So when you ask and I liked Drew’s answer about why it’s important with marijuana, with THC, with Hemp, with all of these things, there’s so much that has gone into why that plant is illegal and it is very racially motivated against black and Brown people. So we have to actively combat that as we as a nation are going through this moment of racial equity. Some moments are happening and that the fight around cannabis is a frontline in that way.

Matt Baum:
One of the really cool things that I’ve seen in Nebraska, just like every other state, we have definitely jerked our native American people around and now they’ve said, “well, we’re going to start growing marijuana and Hemp because it’s our land and you guys don’t want to patrol it, you don’t want to take care of it, you say it’s not part of the United States, so there you go.” And they are, and they’re doing a fantastic job and our governor hates it, and I love that he hates it. You jerks are the reason that they are living where they’re living. Okay. So now we can’t get mad and decide, wait a minute. We don’t like what you’re doing on the land that we said as yours. That isn’t really good for farming other stuff, but that which we’ll do very well there, by the way, and make you a ton of money. Now we’re upset.

Desiree Kane:
I really like what NuWu is doing in Las Vegas. It’s where I grew up. Oh my goodness. It’s beautiful to see native people with economic empowerment that is fueled by a plant that is within the natural order.

Matt Baum:
Right. Not fueled by casinos, which is just-

Desiree Kane:
[inaudible 00:27:24] Around casinos and all of that. But with cannabis, you know it’s another way that you can treat many things. As we know, there are multiple benefits for consuming cannabis of all varieties.

Matt Baum:
Absolutely.

Kit O’Connell:
Desiree can you introduce what NuWu is real quick? There’s a lot of people listening. Won’t know what that is.

Desiree Kane:
Yeah. NuWu I call it the pot grocery store, but it’s a beautiful marijuana dispensary in Las Vegas that is run by the Paiute people native to Las Vegas, who, you know Las Vegas is built upon their ancestral bones. Every time you go swimming there, guess who’s underneath your pool.

Matt Baum:
Yeah. But we like to say, “nah, it’s just a desert. They came out to this desert in the middle of nowhere and we built a strip and now it’s beautiful and gorgeous and there’s famous people in restaurant.” And like, yeah there was something there before you jackasses and it wasn’t just sand. So-

Desiree Kane:
Oh, there’s also like a beautiful Springs there that that tribe has really fought to preserve also.

Matt Baum:
This is awesome and this has been a great discussion and I think again, we go into speaking about marijuana THC, because it is the same plant at the end of the day. It’s the same plant and any legislation that is good for marijuana is even better for Hemp because it erodes that case. That’s out there and saying, “well, we don’t know and it might be a little scary and maybe we shouldn’t feed it to animals and if kids eat the seeds, what’ll happen.” Like it’s time to settle down. It’s time to listen to the American public that has voted and said, we want this and we’re going to see more and more States fall and it is going to be legal. I think it is a foregone conclusion and it wouldn’t surprise me in the next two years. We don’t even have to talk about this garbage anymore and we can laugh about it. Remember that? That was ridiculous. That’s where I hope we end up guys. Thank you so much. Thank you for joining me. This was fantastic.

Drew De Los Santos:
Thanks Matt. I was just going to say one thing real quick, is that another reason it’s important is because if it’s one that we all Agree on, like we should hold on to one good thing that people from all walks of life can agree on. We need that right now.

Matt Baum:
Right. Because it seems like there’s not a lot ofs we do agree this country at the moment. So.

Kit O’Connell:
I think in our ideal world, what would I see for the future? You know we are still going to have distinct industries. It’s not like Hemp is going to disappear if we legalize marijuana, because they are so different. I hope we will invest more in fiber Hemp and in all the ways we can use Hemp, if we get rid of all these like you said, just all these distinctions, if we’re allowed to explore the whole plant, but I think it’ll be better for everybody.

Matt Baum:
Most definitely because we’re not going to, in a position where it’s like, okay, so marijuana is legalized. Let’s make cattle feed out of it. No, that is where Hemp will come in. You know, that that fibers woods, plastics, cardboard’s, that is where Hemp is going to come in and it’s going to come in huge and there’s just no way to stop it. It’s just a matter of catching up, education, that’s what we’re here for help you guys and we just have to keep screaming in our leaders and letting them know we want it fights not over. That’s a most important thing to remember big wins in this election, but the fight is not over.

Kit O’Connell:
I agree completely.

Final thoughts from Matt

Matt Baum:
I hope you dug this little break from our usual format, and I hope it was informative too and I hope you understand that. Yes, just because things have changed and we will have a new White House and a lot of people have new governors and senators and congressmen. We’ve still got to stay on them. We’ve still got to let them know we want cannabis legislation in this country, because it is better for everyone from the buyer to the farmer to keep fighting the good fight out there guys and don’t forget, we hear the Ministry of Hemp think that an accessible world is a better world for everyone. So you can find a complete written transcription of this episode in the show notes for this post at MinistryofHemp.com

Matt Baum:
That brings us to the end of this episode, but maybe you have some questions about legislation in your state or who you need to talk to, to help fight the good fight, or maybe you just have some Hemp questions. That’s totally cool and we would love to hear from you. You can call us at (402) 819-6417 and leave your Hemp question on our hotline. We, perhaps this panel we had today, we’ll answer it right here on one of our Q and A shows, or you can also send an MP3 question to me, Matt@MinistryofHemp.com just make sure that your message is in MP3 form so we can play it on the show and be sure to leave your name too so we know who we’re addressing and if you want to read more about this subject, head over to MinistryofHemp.com we have a fantastic story.

Matt Baum:
Hemp after election 2020 legalizing cannabis will make Hemp thrive. It’s one of our featured stories right now, and it really drills down into a lot of these subjects, really informative stuff. If you enjoy informative stuff like that, follow us on all our social medias @ministryofhemp/ministryofhemp and if you want to support us and help us get more of this information out there and push more Hemp education, head to patrion.com/ministryofhemp and you can become a Ministry of Hemp insider. We’ll have a link right in the show notes for this episode, you can click on and when you do it, any amount that you donate to help us out, first of all, I can’t stress how much it helps, but any amount you donate makes you an insider. It gets you access to early stories to podcast extras and all kinds of other cool stuff we’re doing.

Matt Baum:
But first and foremost, it helps us so much. Also, if you dig what you hear, do me a favor rate this podcast, give us a star or even a short written review, because it’s seriously, it helps so much to push us up in search algorithms to get this show in front of people that are looking for more information on Hemp. All right, I can go on about this all day long but I got stuff I got to do. So I’m going to get out of here and I like to sign off the same way every time by saying, remember to take care of yourself, take care of others and make good decisions. Will you, this is Matt Baum with the Ministry of Hemp signing off.

Voters chose cannabis legalization in election 2020. What does that mean for the future of industrial hemp? Photo: A whiite person's hand holds up a hemp leaf, with the word "Legalize" added next to it. Cannabis election
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Matt Baum has been hosting, producing, and editing podcasts for almost ten years. He's been a touring musician, chef, journalist, and avid comic book fan for as long as he can remember. Currently, Matt lives in Omaha Nebraska with his wife Kacie and pugs Mable and Bobo.

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